Al Forthan Trainings

We began the Al Forthan Scholarship Training Series to provide current information to those who are serving marginalized populations. Through our training series, we raise a significant amount of money for the Al Forthan Scholarship. We charge a fee for the trainings, but all of the proceeds go towards the Al Forthan Scholarship. By attending these trainings you are able to learn from informative and influential people in the social work field, while also helping raise money for students to attend college. Take a look at this year’s Training Series below and see which trainings interest you.

If you work for an agency, you and your agency partner with us in co-presenting an Al Forthan training to raise funds for the Al Forthan Scholarship. What we would ask of your agency is to commit to sending several of your staff to the training and assist us in advertising the training with your partner agencies and contacts. It is a great way for your agency to learn current and useful information while also helping to raise money for the Scholarship.  Email Greg Stone at gstone@voaor.org if your agency is interested in partnering with us to offer a training.

2018 – 2019 Training Series

 Email Alex Rice at arice@voaor.org if you have any questions. 

October 15th

8:30am-12pm

Stephanie

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The Practice of Cultivating Hope For Change

With Stéphanie Wahab. PhD, MSW

Hope has long been recognized, in research and practice wisdom, as a key ingredient to helping people change. Consider the placebo effect, optimism, and self-efficacy. Cultivating hope includes finding it, recognizing it, growing it, and lending it. This training will focus on the place of hope within motivational interviewing, followed by exercises and practices to support service providers and other helpers, to cultivate hope in themselves and consequently in their clients.

October 30th

8:30am-4:30pm

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Understanding and Practicing Cultural Empathy

With Julie Dodge, D.Min, LMSW

8:30-11:30 – “But I wouldn’t Do That!” – Understanding Cultural Empathy. All too often throughout my career as a social worker and educator, I have heard people talk about situations with the people they serve in which the client chooses a specific course of action, and the “helper” explains to me how the client made the wrong choice because the helper would not have done it that way. Far too often we neglect to recognize that the choices we make are often grounded in our culture – our shared practices, beliefs, and traditions. In this morning session we will discuss the need for cultural empathy, the practice of cultural empathy, and how it might lead to better outcomes for the people we serve.

 

1:00 – 4:30 – Practicing Cultural Empathy. Having come to an understanding of what cultural empathy is, in this afternoon session we will practice methods of using and teaching cultural empathy, from narrative and storytelling, to perspective shifting and empathy journeys.

 

November 20th

8:30am-12pm

Del

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Ethically Sound Addictions Interventions for Addressing the Unique Needs of Individuals who Identify as LGBTQ+/Gender Non-Binary

With Del Quest, PhD, LCSW

Members of the LGBTQ+ community face unique challenges which contribute to rates of addiction that are higher than among the general population. Experiences of stigma and discrimination, hate crimes, emotional abuse, and family rejection are common. Substance use can become a way to self-medicate and numb uncomfortable feelings. The purpose of this training is to improve treatment provider’s awareness of these challenges and offer specific strategies that are culturally appropriate and supportive.

 

November 20th

1:00pm-4:30pm

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Creative Adjustments and Attunements: Providing support for clients who are regulating traumatic experiences through substance use

With Daren Ford, LCSW

Working with clients or clients with family members who are struggling with substance use disorder can be challenging due to shame, guilt, stigma, and physical dependency. But the more underlying issue that can continue to create obstacles is trauma. This training provides some understanding of the effective interventions that are available for clients who continue to use substance use to attune and adjust to their environment.

January 8th

8:30am-12:00pm

Becky

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Self-Regulation Strategies & Cognitive Neuroscience:

Methods for Managing Myself

With Becky Miller, MEd., PsyS

Self-Regulation is the core emotional intelligence capacity that we all call upon in our daily lives in any situation that causes discomfort. These conscious or unconscious mechanisms reduce our level of distress and pain and re-establish our equilibrium. The first half of this hands-on session is exploring the cognitive neuroscience of how we self-regulate. Yes, teaching adults about their brains! A fundamental human capacity is the ability to regulate & control our thoughts & behavior. Recent developments in neuroscience have increased our understanding of the neural underpinnings of self-regulation. The second half of the workshop will include a case study look at factors that impact one’s ability to consciously choose self-soothing positive strategies We will explore how adults temper their distress in a variety of ways every day. For most of us, this means we own a bag full of strategies, which include a mix of desirable and undesirable responses that help or hurt us. We will explore the conscious choices that are available when we are present in the NOW moment, separating ourselves from the power of our past. Additional resources will be provided for individual program use.

January 8th

1:00pm-4:30pm

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Sexual Boundaries & Ethics Violations

Eric Martin, MAC, CADC III, PRC, CPS

This three hour training is presented by Eric Martin, Director of Compliance with the Mental Health & Addiction Certification Board of Oregon (MHACBO).  MHACBO certifies all of Oregon’s unlicensed behavioral health workers.  Eric manages Code of Conduct complaints and investigations of Oregon’s 10,000+ behavioral health workers.  Approximately, 1/3rd of all complaints involve sex, sexuality, romance, or sexualized communications.  Moreover, as a result of changes in the MHACBO Code of Ethics and Oregon “vulnerable population” regulations, a greater number of individuals are being revoked as a result of sexual/sexualized boundary violations.  This training will review data from MHACBO Ethics cases, and will discuss prevention strategies.

 

February 12th

8:30am-4:30pm

nikki

 

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Racism as an Ethical Issue

With Nikki Johnson, MA, CADC III

Meets the 6 hour continuing education Ethics requirement. This workshop builds awareness of unintentional counselor bias. Explores cultural context, counselor defenses, micro aggressions, and strategies to enhance counselor competence and commitment to anti-racism. Uses video, small group discussion and individual exploration activities.

March 11th

8:30am-12pm

Jackie Trussell photo

 

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Trauma Informed Care in School Settings: Removing Shame. Restoring Hope. Reducing Isolation.

With Jackie Trussell, LCSW  

Our schools serve many students with histories of traumatic life experiences. As educators and mental health professionals it is imperative that we recognize the potential impacts of trauma on the development, learning, and response to treatment in our students. We understand that the purpose of Trauma Informed Care is to promote resiliency, health and wellness for those who have experienced trauma and to create a minimum standard of care in addressing the impact of trauma. This training will focus on strategies and interventions that facilitate an understanding in recognizing the signs and behaviors associated with trauma.

 

March 11th

1:00pm-4:30pm

Monica Photo

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suicideTALK

With Monica Parmley, LCSW  

suicideTALK is a 3-hour workshop that invites interested community members to become more aware of suicide prevention opportunities in their community. Dealing openly with the stigma around suicide, this exploration focuses upon the question, “Should we talk about suicide?” As a suicideTALK-informed session member, you will be better able to:

• understand how personal and community beliefs about suicide affect suicide stigma and safety;

• appreciate how the steps taught in suicideTALK can be used to help prevent suicide;

• choose among ways to help protect, preserve and promote life in a suicide-safer community.

• identify additional resources and training opportunities to foster more in-depth knowledge of suicide prevention and intervention

April 15th

8:30am-4:30pm

Angie Hernandez

Cristina Castaño Henao

Quinn Colling

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Relationship Based Services Training

With Angie Hernandez, Cristina Castaño Henao, and Quinn Colling

JOIN’s Relationship Based Services training will provide an overview of their outreach, housing placement, and retention models that are rooted in racial equity.  The trainers will use a combination of learning modalities including presentation, discussion, and experiential learning to highlight the key principles and practices that are at the heart of JOIN’s approach to outreach and retention.

 

May 13th

8:30am-12pm

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gita

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Navigating Predominantly White Organizations:  Exploring Strategies for Surviving and Thriving as People of ColorThis training is for people of color only

With Marina Barcelo, MSW, MA and Dr. Gita Mehrotra MSW, PhD.

This session will be an opportunity for people of color who work in predominantly white organizations to focus on our lived experiences and strategies for navigating these spaces.  Through interactive dialogue and a panel discussion with a diverse group of community practitioners, participants will share some of the challenges of working in dominant culture spaces, explore opportunities for growth and professional development within those settings, and discuss the importance of self and community care to sustain ourselves in our work. Participants will develop and share strategies for surviving and thriving in our work as people of color working and living in predominantly white environments while recognizing some of the unique and shared experiences that we have as people of color with diverse, intersectional identities, roles, and contexts.

May 13th

1:00pm-4:30pm

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Utilizing Cultural Humility Within Addictions Counseling to Enhance the Therapeutic Alliance

With Alexia DeLeon, Ph.D, NCC

Cultural humility is a newer theoretical framework being used within counseling related contexts. When mental health professionals work within the cultural humility framework, they are able to have a precise view of their own cultural values, while simultaneously valuing an other-oriented perspective. This framework aims to enhance the therapeutic alliance by helping mental health professionals learn to value, respect and honor the cultural values their clients hold. This training will help attendees learn how to work from the cultural humility framework within addictions counseling in order to enhance the therapeutic alliance.

 

June 17th

8:30am-12pm

Laura Nissen

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A Futures Lens for Addictions: Collective Imagination, Intelligence and Agility

With Laura Burney Nissen, Ph.D., LMSW, CADC III

What if there was a way to think about the future in a better way?   In fact, for the last 50 years, there is a set of emerging frameworks and practices developed to refine and better apply, deep and concentrated effort in imagining an array of futures (both positive as well as negative) and aligning our readiness to meet whatever comes. Futures practice is an interdisciplinary established field and worthy of consideration in the addictions field and beyond.   Including, but not limited to, strategic planning and design-related thinking – it involves skills of “foresight” and an ability to conduct and then apply deep scans of ecosystem factors and then apply them in creative ways, aligning them with human-centered values such as equity, justice, freedom and progress.    How do issues like biomedical technology, the future of work, climate change and a host of other emergent issues present opportunities and challenges to addictions advocacy and practice?  Should addictions professionals and advocates be futurists as part of our ethical imperative?  This presentation will challenge participants to consider the urgent need to update our intellectual maps, tools and navigation tools for the next chapter of our shared journey into the future. Bringing the best of imagination, intelligence, diverse perspectives and agency – futures thinking invites communities to increase the chances of building towards a desired future, yet being ready for the full range of possibilities.